Literature

Overview

A concentration and a minor

We are living a global existence. From organizations to television to social media to matters of the economy, our world is getting smaller. To understand the world, you must be able to interpret it and acquire the skills necessary to navigate successfully through complex problems that have no easy solutions. You must also be capable of understanding people with backgrounds and experiences that don’t resemble your own.

The Literature concentration reflects the changing and dynamic landscape of literary studies and offers you the opportunity to study and learn U.S. and international literatures. You’ll be able to:

  • Understand the formation of “literature,” including an historical overview of the development of British and American literatures, as well as an in-depth study of literary genres, such as poetry, drama, and narrative.
  • Explore the emergence of new voices, approaches, and critical shifts within the field of literary studies. These developments reflect an increasingly diverse U.S. society and the proliferation of new literary genres and movements within a global context.
  • Engage in the creative act of writing. This includes workshops in poetry and fiction writing, as well as opportunities to produce sustained research projects in literary studies.

The Department of English and Cultural Studies is committed to examining, interrogating, and reimagining forms of literacy. The development of this skill — critical literacy — is central to the process of becoming a responsibly engaged global citizen. The Literature concentration enables you to connect your passionate study of literature with a lively engagement of the world beyond the Bryant campus. The literature minor complements other courses of study and teaches necessary critical-thinking skills.

Future careers, post-grad opportunities

Through Literature courses, you will develop reading, writing, and critical thinking skills that will prepare you for a variety of careers with nonprofit and government organizations, museums and art galleries, and in publishing, writing, marketing, and advertising. You will also be well prepared for an array of graduate programs and law schools.

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Requirements

For an 18-credit concentration:

Introduction to Literary Studies (LCS121)

One (1) literary context course from the following:

  • British Literary Contexts: Beginnings to Restoration (LCS363)
  • British Literary Contexts: Restoration to the Present (LCS364)
  • American Literary Contexts: Beginnings to the Civil War (LCS365)
  • American Literary Contexts: The Civil War to the Present  (LCS366)

Senior Seminar in Critical Theory (LCS490)

Three (3) additional courses offered by the Department of English and Cultural Studies

Optional: Senior Practicum (LCS491)

For a 12-credit minor:

Introduction to Literary Studies (LCS121)
One literary context course from the following: LCS363, LCS364, LCS365, or LCS366
One course at 300 or 400 level that is multicultural in focus

One course at the 300 or 400 level from the following:

  • Advanced topics in literature at the 400 level
  • Genre based courses at the 300 level
  • Creative writing courses at the 300 level 

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Upcoming Application Deadlines:

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To learn more, please contact:
Elizabeth Walden, Ph.D.
Professor 
Department of English and Cultural Studies
ewalden@bryant.edu  

COLLABORATION IS KEY

Jeff Cabusao, Ph.D.
Assistant professor of English and Cultural Studies

“Collaboration is at the heart of the Bryant University educational experience, learning to work together [...] learning to work with a variety of people […] to work across differences,” says Cabusao, who describes his research interests as Asian American Studies, U.S. Ethnic Studies, and Women’s Studies, among others. Cabusao, a prolific author, conference participant, and sought-after expert in his field, has earned a number of honors throughout his career. The National Council of Teachers of English awarded Cabusao with the Early Career Educator of Color Leadership Award in 2011; Bryant recognized his work with a Merit Award in 2010; and he earned a Mellon Postdoctoral Teaching Fellowship in 2006 from Kalamazoo (MI) College.