Published 01/20/12

A look at U.S. sci-tech competitiveness

SMITHFIELD, R.I. (Jan. 20, 2012) -- José-Marie Griffiths, vice president for academics at Bryant University, was quoted in scores of media outlets this week regarding a new study of trends in U.S. global competitiveness in science and technology.

NSF logo The study was conducted by the National Science Board, t he policy-making body for the National Science Foundation. Dr. Griffith, who chaired the committee charged with producing the biennial report, took part in two press briefings held in Washington, D.C., the day the study was released.

The study reported that the U.S. is rapidly losing high-technology jobs as American companies expand their research-and-development labs in China and elsewhere in Asia.

New data show "the economic consequences of the eroding competitive advantage the United States has historically enjoyed in science and technology." José-Marie Griffiths

"The latest data clearly show the economic consequences of the eroding competitive advantage the United States has historically enjoyed in science and technology," Griffiths said. "Other nations clearly recognize the economic and social benefits of investing in R&D and education, and they are challenging the United States' leadership position. We're seeing the result in the very real, and substantial, loss of good jobs."

She added that "over the last decade, the world has changed dramatically. It's now a world with very different actors who have made advancement in science and technology a top priority. And many of the troubling trends we're seeing are now very well established."

Her remarks were included in articles published by the Wall Street Journal, Washington Post , Inside Higher Education , Chronicle of Higher Education , and other media outlets.